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CONNECT2017 Lectures

$59.95

This USB stick contains 13 recorded lectures from the CONNECT2017 congress at the University of Ulm in Germany. World-renowned scientists discussed fibrous connective tissues (fascia) within the context of Sports Medicine. Connective tissue, a fibrous tissue that encompasses ligaments, tendons, joint capsules and muscle fascia is often plagued by injury. Professional athletes as well as amateur sportsmen are familiar with this occurrence and often struggle with the injury’s legacy. In the spirit of preventing and managing such occurrences, professional trainers, physiotherapists, sport physicians and physiologists are coming together at the CONNECT 2017 – CONNECTIVE TISSUES IN SPORTS MEDICINE conference.

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Product Description

CONNECT2017 was held at Ulm University from March 16 to 19, 2017. Over 250 participants visited the congress with two days of excellent keynote speeches of international researchers.

Now you can watch these 13 recorded lectures from Internationally renowned scientists at your own pace. The videos of the presentation are recorded in mp4-format available on a USB-stick.

The goal of this congress was to continue the interdisciplinary exchange between physical therapists, athletic trainers, medical doctors, and scientists, regarding fibrous connective tissues (fascia) within the context of Sports Medicine.
Connective tissue, a fibrous tissue that encompasses ligaments, tendons, joint capsules and muscle fascia is often plagued by injury. Professional athletes as well as amateur sportsmen are familiar with this occurrence and often struggle with the injury’s legacy. In the spirit of preventing and managing such occurrences, professional trainers, physiotherapists, sport physicians and physiologists are coming together at the CONNECT 2017 – CONNECTIVE TISSUES IN SPORTS MEDICINE conference.

This series brings fascia into the focus of sports medicine, rehabilitation, and physical therapy: fascia are trainable, important for muscular power transmission, as a sensory organ, for storing elastic energy and frequently, they are accountable for pain symptoms. Targeted fascia training is a new area within the field of Sports Medicine to treat and prevent facial pain syndromes and to increase overall physical performance. Aspects of overloaded collagenous connective tissue are increasingly investigated, to be able to give recommendations regarding dosage and frequency of fascial training.

 

 Contents, Lectures:
  • Molecular Diagnostics of Inflammation in Muscle Injury and Overtraining – Jürgen M. Steinacker,  University of Ulm
  • Exercise affects the Uniformity of Muscle and Tendon Adaptation – Adamantios Arampatzis,  Humboldt University Berlin
    Myofibroblasts just love the Stress – Boris Hinz, University of Toronto
  • The Functional Coupling of the deep Abdominal and Paraspinal Muscles – Andry Vleeming, University of Ghent
  • Effect of Female Hormones on Connective Tissue at Rest and in Response to Exercise – Mette Hansen, Aarhus University
  • The regulation of Connective Tissue Function through Exercise and Nutrition – Keith Baar, University of California Davis
  • Exercise mediated extracellular Matrix Processing – Role for Structure and Function of Skeletal Muscle – Wilhelm Bloch, German Sport University Cologne
  • Loading and Unloading of Connective Tissue – inert or biochemically active? – Michael Kjaer,  University of Copenhagen
  • Neuromotor Control & Fascial Interactions in Sport – Paul Hodges,  University of Queensland
  • Muscle, Tendon and Joint Mechanics in Cerebral Palsy – Constantinos Maganaris, Liverpool John Moores University
  • Soft Tissue Biomechanics in Sports Injury – Is it time to listen to the Tissue? – Scott Wearing, Queensland University of Technology
  • Mechanical Force Transmission along Myofascial Chains: Fact or Fiction? – Jan Wilke,  Goethe University of Frankfurt
  • Running Injuries – Functional Groups, Preferred Movement Path and Comfort Filter – a Paradigm Shift – Benno Nigg, University of Calgary

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